Holford claims a study shows his recommendations reduce Alzheimer’s risk

We were interested to see Holford’s blog trumpeting a new study by Yian Bu et al, on Alzheimer Disease and dietary patterns: claiming that the study shows that “Holford diet reduces Alzheimer’s risk”. Holford’s blog argues that the
study

findings are completely consistent with out recent 100% Health Survey and the diet I recommend in the Alzheimers Prevention Plan book.

These principles are also incorporated into the Holford Diet which also factors in eating a low GL diet. In our 100% Health survey we found that the consumption of sugar-based snacks and sugar were strongly associated with worsening memory and concentration. All the other findings in this recent study, soon to be published in the Archives of Neurology (Arch Neurol. 2010;67[6]), are completely consistent with our survey results.

However, the study states that

We identified a DP [dietary pattern] strongly associated with lower AD risk: compared with subjects in the lowest tertile of adherence to this pattern, the AD hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for subjects in the highest DP tertile was 0.62 (0.43-0.89) after multivariable adjustment (P for trend = .01). This DP was characterized by higher intakes of salad dressing, nuts, fish, tomatoes, poultry, cruciferous vegetables, fruits, and dark and green leafy vegetables and a lower intake of high-fat dairy products, red meat, organ meat, and butter.

This seems rather close to the advice of mainstream organisations such as the BDA (or to my Gran’s advice to ‘eat your greens’). As far as I can tell, the study doesn’t consider the benefits (or disbenefits) of a low glycaemic load diet. It certainly doesn’t show that Holford’s supplement recommendations are effective: instead, “nutrient intakes from foods and from supplements were separately estimated, and only the nutrient intake from foods was used in the RRR analysis.”

Certainly, we have no objection to some of Holford’s recommendations: for example, eating lots of green veg seems perfectly sensible. However, these good recommendations are not at all original and we have not seen any convincing evidence that his more novel recommendations are any good.

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1 Comment

Filed under Alzheimer's, patrick holford

One response to “Holford claims a study shows his recommendations reduce Alzheimer’s risk

  1. So in other words it’s another case of “eat food, not too much, mostly plants” (although fish & white meat seem to be OK too, a common finding).

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